Feminist Ex Machina

Here she comes to save the day.

718 notes

ted:

Let’s treat violence like a contagious disease
Gary Slutkin created one of the most successful anti-violence campaigns in recent history. But he’s not a police chief or a city mayor — he’s a doctor. He spent a decade treating AIDS, cholera and tuberculosis in Africa, and when he came home to the US, he saw a strange link: gun violence was spreading just like those diseases.
In his 2013 TEDMED talk, he explains how he helped curb gun violence by treating it like a disease. Watch it here »

ted:

Let’s treat violence like a contagious disease

Gary Slutkin created one of the most successful anti-violence campaigns in recent history. But he’s not a police chief or a city mayor — he’s a doctor. He spent a decade treating AIDS, cholera and tuberculosis in Africa, and when he came home to the US, he saw a strange link: gun violence was spreading just like those diseases.

In his 2013 TEDMED talk, he explains how he helped curb gun violence by treating it like a disease. Watch it here »

894 notes

My apologies to Douglas Adams.

Ubisoft:
But fans, Assassin's Creed: Liberation, a game featuring a female protag has been available for purchase for the last two years!
Fans:
Oh yes, well as soon as I heard I went straight round to see it, yesterday afternoon. You hadn't exactly gone out of your way to call attention to it, had you? I mean, like actually telling anybody or anything.
Ubisoft:
But the game WAS advertised on par with our other games.
Fans:
Advertised? I eventually had to go down to the cellar to find it.
Ubisoft:
That's where we advertise games.
Fans:
With a flashlight.
Ubisoft:
Ah, well the lights had probably gone.
Fans:
So had the stairs.
Ubisoft:
But look, you found the game, didn't you?
Fans:
Yes. Yes I did. The singular game you've made in this franchise featuring a female protagonist was advertised on par with your other games. In a dark cellar with no stairs, in the bottom of a locked filing cabinet, stuck in a disused lavatory, with a sign on the door saying "Beware of the Leopard."

22,197 notes

harrenholler:

"There’s this issue you’re not allowed to discuss: that women are needy. Men can go for longer, more happily, without women. That’s the truth. We don’t, as little boys, play at being married - we try to avoid it for as long as possible. Meanwhile women are out there hunting for husbands."

                                                                              -Steven Moffat [x]

I just want to frame that and hang it on the wall of every Moffat apologist, so they can wake up and look at that every morning. 

(via skyestiels)

22 notes

idetonatearoundhim:

Ana has been back at work for less than an hour and Christian is pissed that changing her email address to her married name wasn’t her top priority. OR GOING TO HAPPEN AT ALL OHHHH what now you paternalistic sack of shit

idetonatearoundhim:

Ana has been back at work for less than an hour and Christian is pissed that changing her email address to her married name wasn’t her top priority. OR GOING TO HAPPEN AT ALL OHHHH what now you paternalistic sack of shit

90,189 notes

historicallyaccuratesteve:

ifeelbetterer:

miwrighting:

kototyph:

leupagus:

killerville:

   

WOOED THE WORD YOU’RE LOOKING FOR IS WOOED

GUESS WHOSE TAGS ARE TOTALLY GETTING REBLOGGED

Star-struck Interviewer: “You must miss the good old days.”

Steve Rogers: “I grew up in a tenement slum. Rats, lice, bedbugs, one shared bathroom per floor with a bucket of water to flush, cast iron coal-burning stove for cooking and heat. Oh, and coal deliveries - and milk deliveries, if you could get it - were by horse-drawn cart. One summer I saw a workhorse collapse in the heat, and the driver started beating it with a stick to make it get up. We threw bricks at the guy until he ran away. Me and Bucky and our friends used to steal potatoes or apples from the shops. We’d stick them in tin cans with some hot ashes, tie the cans to some twine, and then swing ‘em around as long as we could to get the ashes really hot. Then we’d eat the potato. And there were the block fights. You don’t know what a block fight was? That’s when the Irish or German kids who lived on one block and the Jewish or Russian kids who lived on the next block would all get together into one big mob of ethnic violence and beat the crap out of each other. One time I tore a post out of a fence and used it on a Dutch kid who’d called Bucky a Mick. Smacked him in the head with the nails.”

Interviewer: “LET’S TALK ABOUT THE INTERNET.”

Steve Rogers: “I love cat pictures.”

(Many biographical details are taken from Streetwise, either from Jack Kirby’s autobiographical story or Nick Cardy’s contribution: http://twomorrows.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=52&products_id=513 )

it got better

I really like this post, but I take issue with this section of the reblogged tags:  

As someone planning to work in museums, I can tell you right now that the Smithsonian probably had to fight tooth and nail to honestly and faithfully represent the diversity of the Howling Commandos. Museums of that caliber are much like libraries in terms of providing free knowledge and are committed to accuracy and proper representation of history.

Especially given the National Air and Space Museum’s history with the Enola Gay controversy (short version: NASM was forced to cancel the planned exhibit because it focused too much on the Japanese casualties of the atom bomb and not enough on the justifications for the bomb or its role in ending the war), it’s far more likely that any erasure of Jones or Morita was caused by competing interest groups and political machinations, not by the curators, exhibit designers, or the Smithsonian Institution itself. They were probably overjoyed at Steve’s righteous anger over weakened representation of Jones and Morita and I can imagine they pulled out their original designs and asked if he could publicly announce his approval for them so they could fix what politics had wrought.

(Source: forassgard, via knitmeapony)